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Discussing Transatlantic Partnership at the American-German Situation Room

As a fellow in the American-German Situation Room, I sought to learn as much as possible about the approach and direction of the Trump administration. In discussions with various experts, …

Germany’s Budget Surplus: Is Too Much of a Good Thing a Bad Thing?

Many who are familiar with Germany and German culture know that saving money and only spending money that one has is a very German trait. Only 36 percent of Germans …

Reforming the Eurozone: A Transatlantic Perspective

Over the last decade, the state of the Eurozone has become a serious concern in the transatlantic relationship. At the outset of the European sovereign debt crisis, the United States …

America’s Four Economic Families

The United States may have two major political parties, but it is becoming clear that it has four economic families: Small government + free trade = Mainstream Republicans Small government …

U.S. Elections: Impact on the European Economy

Uncertainty Prevails Ten days after Donald Trump was elected president, the impact on the global and the European economy is still hard to predict. What prevails is uncertainty about Trump’s …

Waiting for German Domestic-led Growth

Criticism of German domestic economic policy has reached unprecedented intensity in recent weeks.  The United States Department of Treasury and the European Commission have both called out Germany for its …

The Politics of Central Banking

According to AICGS Senior Fellow Alexander Privitera, both the Federal Reserve (FED) and the European Central Bank (ECB) are increasingly becoming political bodies, forced by growing public scrutiny to build their own constituencies.

The Exit Strategy

At the recent AICGS conference “Rising Tensions between the European Central Bank and the Bundesbank,” AICGS Senior Fellow Alexander Privitera and David Marsh, Co-Chairman of the Official Monetary and Financial …

The Master Tactician

Facing increasing headwinds within her coalition, Merkel has decided to ask for a constitutional majority of two thirds of lawmakers to endorse the European fiscal pact, arguably her main personal achievement since the beginning of the crisis. It was a bold tactical move that could have far reaching consequences.