AICGS

Alexander Privitera

Non-Resident Fellow

Alexander Privitera is a Non-Resident Fellow at AICGS. He focuses primarily on Germany’s European policies and their impact on relations between the United States and Europe. Previously, Mr. Privitera was the Washington-based correspondent for the leading German news channel, N24. As a journalist, over the past two decades he has been posted to Berlin, Bonn, Brussels, and Rome. Mr. Privitera was born in Rome, Italy, and holds a degree in Political Science (International Relations and Economics) from La Sapienza University in Rome.

Recent Content

Reset

Closing the Gap: Can Europe’s Economy Finally Catch Up with the U.S.?

The year 2016 has been characterized by growing uncertainty about the strength of the global economy: uncertainty about the ability of emerging markets—and especially China—to successfully address cyclical and structural …

AICGS Podcast: IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings and the Road to Economic Revival in Europe

Immediately after the IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings, AICGS Non-resident Senior Fellow Peter Rashish dials in from across the Atlantic for a discussion with AICGS Senior Fellow Alexander Privitera on the …

Stepping Over the Line: Schäuble Criticizes ECB

German finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble was forced by Jens Weidmann,  president of the powerful Bundesbank, to publicly state that he fully respects the independence of the European Central Bank (ECB) …

The Perfect Storm

The ongoing refugee crisis has exposed new cracks in the European Union. While some European leaders, including those in the German government, had been reluctant to define the debt crisis …

A Bigger Spot on the Global Stage

In an era that has relegated television, and television news for that matter, to playing defense, it is refreshing for a recovering journalist such as myself to see that international …

Pleasing and Appeasing Markets: A Fatal Attraction

Following the recent and ongoing turmoil in financial markets, largely triggered by the growing uncertainty about the health of the Chinese economy, financial investors have started to expect and demand …

The New Greek Bailout and the Never-Ending Political Fallout in Germany

Greece and its international creditors moved closer to securing a third bailout on Tuesday, paving the way for national parliaments to vote on the agreement before a crucial repayment to …

Saving the Euro: On the Edge between Dream and Disaster

The tough negotiations that led to a deal to negotiate another deal between Greece and its creditors can certainly not be described as the finest hour in the history of …

Breakdown or Breakthrough?

The past few days have certainly been rich with dramatic twists and turns in the Greek drama. Nobody knows with certainty how the story will end—not the Greek politicians, the …

“The Great Divergence”: Elements for an Early Assessment

At the beginning of 2015, as many investors grew increasingly skeptical about the prospects of the euro area’s economy and its central bank’s capacity to fight what appeared to be …

Restructuring Greece’s Sovereign Debt: It’s Not the Answer, Yet

Greece barely managed to repay a loan installment to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) this week, only being able to do so by tapping its own buffer reserves at the …

Greece and Sisyphus: When Myths Risk Becoming Reality

Officially, Greece was not even on the agenda at the Spring meetings of the IMF and World Bank Group last week. But the country’s obstinate flirtation with disaster was very …